Catholic church myth: “The world’s largest charity”. It’s not even close.

Catholics always CLAIM they are the largest charity in the world.  The problem is, they aren’t close.

If you look at independent assessments, like List of wealthiest charitable foundations in wikipedia doesn’t include the Catholic church, you’ll see that the Catholic church doesn’t even rank in the top 38 world charities.  The top 3 wealthiest charitable foundations are:

  1. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation,  United States
  2. Stichting INGKA Foundation, Netherlands
  3. Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom    London

According to CNBC, the top 10 charities in the world can be found here, and a Catholic charity does come in third:

  1. Direct Relief
  2. MAP International
  3. Catholic Medical Mission Board
  4. United Nations Foundation

The Catholic church IS the wealthiest institution in the word, spending a tremendous amount of money on it’s buildings, like the $30 million mansion that New York Cardinal Dolan lives in.  Other Catholic cardinals live in similar riches.

If anyone has evidence that the Catholic church IS near the world’s top charities, from a legitimate independent site, please put it in the comments below and I will update this post.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Catholic church myth: “The world’s largest charity”. It’s not even close.

  1. Politifact: Catholic charity accounts for 17 percent of all nonprofit social service charity in the U.S., easily the largest charity in the U.S.

  2. I don’t have such evidence, but the Catholic church doesn’t show in those rankings because it is not dubbed as a single organization but as hundreds of thousands of smaller ones. So the fact that it doesn’t show up in the rankings doesn’t prove anything.
    There is some serious analysis that indicates that, dumber by money and people involved they ARE the largest one (by a 3:1 margin to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation).
    The problem with that logic is that most of their efforts did not go into something that is a tangible benefit to those in need, and one could argue that they indeed harm people (like when they convince people not to use condoms) and still count that as charity.
    So the analysis you do is incorrect, but the conclusion is likely valid.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s